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May 27, 2018, 02:35:41 am
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Shops in Featherstone

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Author Topic: Shops in Featherstone  (Read 1759 times)
seneca bond
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« Reply #40 on: May 28, 2011, 04:34:46 pm »

there were two chemists
Cawson's and Timothy White and Taylors
Timothy White's were taken over by Boots and the shop closed down. The shop was taken over by The Asquith brothers Ralph and Luke who previously had a shop over the road. Cawson's was on Green lane in the parade thaat had Amery's veg shop on the corner, ken Varley's bookies, the wakefield Co-op(recently bellfields) a cobblers and the green lane club.
Cawsons moved to the shop on the corner of station lane which is now a travel agents.Mr Cawson was an interesting man. He made his own shampoo and toiletries, and you got your photos developed at his sshop. He ws probably the only jewish person in the town. A family called the Mirtages was I think the only black family.
What was Mynet's oufitters is now a bookies, next to that was the gas board, which I think is now a solicitors.

the only shop, if you can call it a shop which still exists as it was is the Dentists, just up from the bottom of the lane. It had this strange smell to it, a mixture of dettol, and rubber as you walked in which made you nervous: no local anaesthetic in the 1950s. You had to be in a bad way to go. It was entirely remedial.
on the opposite corner of salbert street to Tommy Keenan's off ;icence was pollards: a kind of genrral store. They sold stuff like air gun pellets, and 'battler britain' comics and model aeroplane kits.
There were two main newsagents. One was the famousd Dransfields, as someone said originally on a parede of shops where thre appalling market square now stands. On this parade was a chippie, a fruit and veg shop, andf an army surplus stores-the only shop that sold jeans. The other newsagents was Malpass', this shop was until quite recently a post office.

Ther other outfitters was opposite this. Burras Peake-this was where you got your snake belts and your first suit from. This shop is the recently closed prom wear shop.
The big fishing/model shop was the pontefract co-op. Our divi number was 6134
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Victor
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« Reply #41 on: June 01, 2011, 08:42:27 am »

Roleys fish shop in Streethouse, never altered, never changed, used to come out of either the Top House or Middle House or the Club call into Roleys for one of each and eat them on the way home with salt and vinegar on in the newspaper, sadly all have gone now.
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Forkhandles
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« Reply #42 on: June 05, 2011, 07:01:09 pm »

As i remember it,in the fifties the promwear shop was the yorkshire penny bank  Grin
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seneca bond
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« Reply #43 on: June 06, 2011, 08:42:06 am »

you might be right
but as I remember the YPB was originally a kikmd of wooden hut, then they moved  down a few doors to the premises that is now the banl with the ATMs

the dreary little parade that houses bargain booze and various take aways, was originally a small row, which had 'Cap Corner on the end, where that cafe now is facing the gospel hall. This is where you got you first Jimmy Clitheroe type cap, and blokes flat caps and trilbys, there were lots of little drawers with collar studs and stuff like that in them

What is now a taxi firm was maxwell's furniture. The older Mr Maxwell suffered from shell shock in the first world war. The younger Mr maxwell wrote a very interesting book about his experiences in the Normandy invasion.
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yetion1
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READY


« Reply #44 on: September 14, 2011, 08:13:47 pm »

Another great record of Featherstone history saved by Jim Williams.
What’s the chances of naming the rest for 1936?
Next numbers are 93 and 86

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seneca bond
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« Reply #45 on: September 14, 2011, 10:10:28 pm »

Another great record of Featherstone history saved by Jim Williams.
What’s the chances of naming the rest for 1936?
Next numbers are 93 and 86


what a wonderful historic record
the palace billiard hall had become a wire works by the time I was a kid. The hairdressers was now run by smithies, but many of the other shops were the same.
thank you very much for reproducing it.
My mam bought me my first snake belt, and whitsuntide suit from Burras Peake.
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